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Assessment Policy KS1

Assessment Policy KS1

Prasarnmit Primary International Program (PPiP)

Reviewed by: Ildiko Bartalosova
Review Period: 2 years     
Date Adopted: November 2015
Next Review: November 2017

 
Contents
 
Our School Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Introduction to Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Aims and Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 & 3
Principles of Marking and Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Organisation and Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 & 4
The Role of Co-teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
 
Our School Vision
 
The creation of our school vision involved the whole school community. Prasarnmit Primary International Program (PPiP) is a nurturing, inclusive school that provides children with the knowledge and skills to prepare them for their future in an ever changing world.
 
At PPiP, we educate and support the whole child by providing opportunities for each child to find and nurture their own unique talents and abilities. At PPiP we offer a safe environment that promotes tolerance and respect as part of an international community. We motivate our students to be happy and confident learners. We create a culture of accomplishment within a vibrant and stimulating learning environment ensuring positive reinforcement at all levels of ability through appropriately differentiated expectations. Children strive to reach their full potential and become independent learners through an engaging and creative curriculum. Our vision is for PPiP pupils to become lifelong learners, who are able to use their own initiative to encourage themselves to grow in confidence and become positive contributors to society. 
 
Introduction
 
At Prasarnmit Primary International Program (PPiP), we take a professional approach to the tasks of marking work and giving feedback on it. There will naturally be some differences in the marking symbols and written feedback given to reflect the age of the children. However, all children are entitled to regular and comprehensive feedback on their learning to enable them to become reflective learners and help them close the gap between current and desired performance. Therefore all teachers will mark work and give feedback as an essential part of the assessment process.
 
Aims and Objectives 
 
We mark children's work and offer feedback in order to:
 

  • Show that we value the children's work, and encourage them to also value it.
  • Boost the pupils' self-esteem and raise aspirations through use of praise and encouragement.
  • Give the children a clear general picture of how far they have come in their learning and how they can improve their work in the future.
  • Offer the children specific information on the extent to which they have met the lesson objective and/or the targets set for them.
  • Promote self-assessment and accept guidance from others.
  • Share expectations progression towards the learning objectives.
  • Gauge the children's understanding and identify misconceptions.
  • Provide a basis for summative and formative assessment.
  • Provide the ongoing assessment that should inform future lesson-planning.
 
Principles of Marking and Feedback
 
We believe that the following principles should underpin all marking and feedback:
 
  • The process of marking and offering feedback should be positive.
  • Marking and feedback is the dialogue between teacher and pupil, ideally while the task is still being completed.
  • Marking should always relate to the lesson objective and, increasingly, the child's own personal learning targets.
  • Time must be given for the child to read and respond to the comments made either verbal or written.
  • Comments should be appropriate to the age and ability of the child, and may vary across year groups and key stages.
  • Comments will focus on only one or two key areas for improvement.
  • Teachers should aim to promote children's self-assessment and peer assessment by linking marking and feedback which includes sharing the learning objectives.
  • Whenever possible, marking and feedback should involve the child directly. The younger the child, the more important it is that the feedback is oral and immediate.
  • Feedback may also be given by Thai co-teachers.
  • Group feedback is provided throughout the lesson.
  • Feedback will help a child to identify key priorities for improvement and the progress they are making towards agreed targets.
  • Teachers will note errors that are made by many children and use them to inform future planning.
  • Marking will always be carried out promptly.
  • Corrections and responses must be completed before the next piece of work commences. This must be an established part of the classroom routine.
 
 
Organisation and Strategies
 
  • Work should always start with the date and title both underlined.
  • Children and teachers must ensure that all pages of exercise books are used.
  • They make it clear what good-quality work in the subject is like.
  • When self correcting pupils should draw a straight line through the error using a pencil and a ruler.
  • Wherever possible, teachers should establish direct links between oral or written praise and the class or school rewards systems. Children who have produced particularly pleasing work should be referred to the Director, who would personally view work and congratulate the child in question.
 
Summative Assessment (feedback/marking)
 
  • •usually consists of ticks and crosses or a dot where errors have been made and is associated with closed tasks or exercises. Other symbols may be used once their meaning has been explained, e.g. a ‘sp' symbol in a margin. (Appendix 1)
  • Wherever possible, children should self-mark or the work should be marked as a class or in groups.
  • In the event that a child has misunderstood a task marking should cease. This will avoid a child receiving a piece of work littered with crosses. Instead a supportive comment should be made and a time arranged for when the task will be revisited.
 
Formative Assessment (feedback/marking)
 
  • With oral feedback, in the course of a lesson, teachers’ comments to children should focus firstly on issues about the learning objective and secondly on other features.
  • Teachers should be positive in their feedback, any negative comments must always be followed up by a constructive statement on how to improve.
 
Procedure
 
  • A smiling face: Underneath the smiling face the teacher should list brief points of success. The should be relevant to the objective and success criteria.
  • A star: Beneath the star the teacher will write a comment or question to extend or reinforce the learning that has taken place in that lesson. Again, these should be related to the objective and success criteria.
 
Quality Marking
 
  • Not all pieces of work can be “quality marked”. Teachers need to decide whether work will simply be acknowledged or given detailed attention.
  • Spelling corrections at Key Stage 1 should be written above the incorrect word. Teachers should focus on high frequency words.
  • At Key Stage 2 no more than three words should be identified for correction. Teachers should focus on high frequency and technical vocabulary when related to the task.
  • Incorrect words should be underlined and the code ‘sp’ marked in the margin. Children should copy out the correct spelling three times underneath the task and add it to their personal spelling bank.
 
Self-marking
 
  • Where possible children should be encouraged to self-evaluate. Children can identify their own successes and look for improvement points.
  • Children should be encouraged to assess their work ahead of final marking.
 
Shared Marking
 
  • We will use one piece of work from a child to mark as a class at regular intervals. This models the marking process and teaches particular points at the same time.
  • Another strategy is to show two pieces of work, with the same title, and discuss their differences.
 
The Role of Thai Co-teachers
 
Teaching Assistants should mark the work of children they are working with during the session and provide verbal feedback. This should form part of their dialogue with the child about how improvements can be made, as well as highlighting achievements.